We’re going to Raspberry Fields!

Exciting news! We’ve been accepted to have a Show & Tell stall at the Raspberry Fields event on 30 June / 1 July. More details to follow, but we’re hoping to bring along a selection of Old Tech. New Spec. projects, and hopefully “The Game” if it’s finished in time.

As they say on the official website:

Raspberry Fields is a brand-new event led by the Raspberry Pi Foundation with lots of help from our community of young people, educators, hobbyists, and tech enthusiasts. It will be a chance for people of all ages and skill levels to have a go at getting creative with tech, as well as a celebration of all that our digital makers have already learnt and achieved, whether through taking part in Code Clubs, CoderDojos, or Raspberry Jams, or through trying our resources at home.

It promises to be a great couple of days, come find us and say hello if you’re attending, there’ll be stickers!

 

YouTube Channel Trailer

The YouTube channel is finally ready for business, Subscribe now for your regular fix of #Retro meets @Raspberry_Pi!

I’m hoping to publish a regular monthly project video with Retro-Spectives and New Spec Reviews in between. The monthly video will cover all the stages of a project in detail so you’ll be able to follow along and give some of your Old Tech a New Spec!

The Game: LCD Shutters

I picked up these LCD shutters a while back from Pimoroni, essentially because they were a new product and I was sure I could use them in a future project.

As they say on the Pimoroni product description:

Essentially single pixel LCD displays, these panels polarise and go black (completely opaque) when you pass 3V through them, and then de-polarise (become transparent) when pulled low or shorted. Easy!

You can treat the LCD shutter like a low value capacitor. Once energised, they will hold their polarised/opaque state, but slowly leak charge over time and become de-polarised/transparent again

The shutters were really well packaged (as you’d hope for something so fragile) and had a clear plastic protector on both sides, which is handy as you’ll handle them a lot.

As you can see in the GIF they go completely opaque when you attach 3v, then slowly become clear again (unless you pull down or short the connections). They don’t seem too fussy about polarity.

This week I finally nailed the concept for using them in a new Raspberry Pi project, which I’m calling “The Game” for now – a long way to go but there’ll be regular updates here and a YouTube video of the whole build when it’s finished.